B-1 flyover planned for Doolittle anniversary


Greene County News



WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE – Two B-1 bombers from the 34th and 37th Bomb Squadrons at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, will participate in a high-speed flyover at the National Museum of the United States Air Force exactly 75 years after aircrews from these same squadrons helped launch the Doolittle Tokyo Raid.

Plans call for the B-1 flyover to take place approximately 3:15 p.m. Tuesday, April 18 at the conclusion of the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders’ memorial service in the museum’s Memorial Park (weather dependent). The flyover will offer visitors a unique opportunity to witness the speed and power of two variable-sweep wing supersonic bombers as they fly by at a speed of 0.9 Mach and then ascend into an unrestricted climb.

Although the 34th and 37th Bomb Squadrons have gone on to fly a variety of aircraft since the Doolittle Tokyo Raid (B-26, B-58, B-66, B-52 and B-1), and transitioned to other commands (they now fall under the command of the 28th Operations Group) – the Raid remains the very cornerstone of their heritage, said 28th Operations Group Commander Col. John Martin.

“We have the proud honor and distinct privilege of being Raider posterity – which includes Jimmy Doolittle’s ‘own’ 34th and 37th Bomb Squadrons,” said Martin. “Our heritage clearly defines us, motivates us and propels us forward against today’s threats. The B-1 “Bone” continues to provide critical around-the-clock long range strike to combatant commanders throughout the world.”

Prior to the memorial service and B-1 flyover, 17 privately-owned B-25 Mitchell bombers from around the country are scheduled to land on the runway behind the museum on April 17, and be placed on static display from 10 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. The aircraft will remain available for public view on April 18 from 9 a.m. until 12 p.m., before departing for a flyover prior to the start of a memorial service in the museum’s Memorial Park at approximately 2:15 p.m.

Greene County News

Story courtesy of the National Museum of the United States Air Force.

Story courtesy of the National Museum of the United States Air Force.