Leadership Float makes a splash


By Karen Rase - [email protected]



Group photo of Leadership Float attendees from the Friday, July 22, float event.

Group photo of Leadership Float attendees from the Friday, July 22, float event.


After the float, attendees gather to discuss river-related topics such as soil erosion, log jams, pollution, etc., and what could be done to address environmental concerns of the Little Miami Watershed Network.


SPRING VALLEY TOWNSHIP — The Little Miami Watershed Network organized a leadership float down the Little Miami River July 22.

Participants met at RiversEdge in Waynesville and were outfitted with canoes, paddles, life jackets, etc., courtesy of the Little Miami Conservancy, a nonprofit dedicated to the restoration and protection of the Little Miami National Wild & Scenic River.

Community leaders were invited to “see the land from the river’s perspective”. The group of 24 participants were transported to Constitution Park and dropped off to enjoy a leisurely 3-4 mile float in which to observe the condition of the river banks, wildlife, water life in southern Greene County.

Guests included Brian Lampton, Ohio House of Representives, Stephanie Goff, Greene County Engineer; Jason Tincu, Director, Sanitary Engineering, Bob Gable, Scenic Rivers/Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Hope Taft, president emeritus of LMWN, Rebecca Victor, Executive Director, LMWN, and Jon Dobney, Director, Greene County Parks & Trails, who gave an introductory talk about what the county is doing to help manage the river’s five major access points.

The group held a discussion-led picnic after returning to RiversEdge where some of the topics included stormwater retention ponds, warm water habitats, soil erosion along the river banks, etc.

“It was a great day to be on the river. We’re here to educate people about the whole watershed for the Little Miami River,” said Rhett Rohrer, president of the Little Miami Conservancy.

“The Little Miami River, starting in South Charleston (Clark County), and ending up at the Ohio River (Hamilton County), is about 107 miles. We try to preserve and protect the main stem of the river and provide a continuous wooded buffer inward from the bank — by planting trees and prairie grass,” stated Rohrer..

“I thought the event went really well and a lot of good information was discussed. The value of the river is tremendous and it requires a lot of people to protect it,” he added.

Group photo of Leadership Float attendees from the Friday, July 22, float event.
https://www.fairborndailyherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/50/2022/07/web1_IMG_5901-group-2-.jpgGroup photo of Leadership Float attendees from the Friday, July 22, float event.

After the float, attendees gather to discuss river-related topics such as soil erosion, log jams, pollution, etc., and what could be done to address environmental concerns of the Little Miami Watershed Network.
https://www.fairborndailyherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/50/2022/07/web1_IMG_5906-discussion-2-.jpgAfter the float, attendees gather to discuss river-related topics such as soil erosion, log jams, pollution, etc., and what could be done to address environmental concerns of the Little Miami Watershed Network.

By Karen Rase

[email protected]

Reach Karen Rase at 937-502-4534.

Reach Karen Rase at 937-502-4534.