WPAFB announces prairie’s prescribed burn season


Submitted photo Darryn Warner, Natural Resources Program Manager, right, and personnel from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks Wildlife Refuge monitor a prescribed burn at the Huffman Prairie in 2016.

Submitted photo Darryn Warner, Natural Resources Program Manager, right, and personnel from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks Wildlife Refuge monitor a prescribed burn at the Huffman Prairie in 2016.


Submitted graphic Quadrants 3 and 4, totaling approximately 50 acres are planned for burning this season on Huffman Prairie.


WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE — Officials from the 88th Civil Engineer Group Natural Resources Program of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base have announced prescribed burn season dates for the annual Huffman Prairie burn.

The burn season begins Thursday, Nov. 1 and ends March 15, 2019.

Prescribed burns on the Huffman Prairie are used to maintain and enhance the health of prairie ecosystems, according to an informational pamphlet provided by the base natural resources program. Potential fire hazards exist as the result of dead vegetation accumulation, which can be reduced by annually burning at least a portion of the prairie. The burn also helps control the spread of woody species that can easily adapt to the local climate and take over land. Burning the prairie stimulates the growth of original and native prairie species as well as eradicates the invasive species.

“Approximately 50 acres are planned for burning this season,” said Darryn Warner, natural resources program manager. “Tall-grass, warm-season prairies are fire-dependent and rely upon periodic fire for regeneration purposes. Fire is a natural management tool that releases essential nutrients back into the soil, reduces the thatch layer and aids in reducing the fuel load which aids in controlling wildland fires. Many rare species of plants on Huffman Prairie rely upon the benefit provided by prescribed fire and the species that depend upon those rare plant species for food and/or habitat also benefit.”

To be successful, very precise temperature, relative humidity, wind direction, wind speed and ground moisture conditions must be present. Burns are typically accomplished in the fall, partly because the ground is often too wet in the spring.

Information Regarding Prescribed Burns at Huffman Prairie:

– Weather forecasts are reviewed beginning 7-10 days out.

– If a suitable weather window is available, an informational email will be sent out detailing the window.

– If a suitable weather window exists five days out, another email will be sent out requesting information concerning conflicting mission schedules, personnel schedules, availability of resources, etc.

– If a suitable weather window exists three days out, a USFWS burn team may mobilize, depending upon available resources, mission schedule and USFWS burn team schedule.

– If sufficient resources are available and there are no mission schedule conflicts, and USFWS burn team mobilizes, 24-36 hours prior to the actual scheduled prescribed fire, additional informational emails will go out to various sources, including, but not limited to: WPAFB Airfield Management, National Park Service, EOD, the Rod and Gun Club, Security Forces, WPAFB Fire and Emergency Services and 88 Civil Engineering.

– The day of the ‘scheduled burn’ could arrive and a shift in the wind/other unexpected weather event or an unscheduled mission requirement could cause the prescribed fire to be cancelled for that day. If resources are available and the weather is conducive for the next day, a prescribed fire will be planned for the next day.

– Prescribed fires will be conducted any day of the week. It will not be limited to normal business hours Monday through Friday. If weather and resources are available, the base will be planning and burning.

For more information about the Huffman Prairie prescribed burn season, contact Darryn Warner at 937-257-4857 or darryn.warner@us.af.mil.

Submitted photo Darryn Warner, Natural Resources Program Manager, right, and personnel from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks Wildlife Refuge monitor a prescribed burn at the Huffman Prairie in 2016.
https://www.fairborndailyherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/50/2018/10/web1_wpafbburn2.jpgSubmitted photo Darryn Warner, Natural Resources Program Manager, right, and personnel from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Big Oaks Wildlife Refuge monitor a prescribed burn at the Huffman Prairie in 2016.

Submitted graphic Quadrants 3 and 4, totaling approximately 50 acres are planned for burning this season on Huffman Prairie.
https://www.fairborndailyherald.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/50/2018/10/web1_wpafbburn1.jpgSubmitted graphic Quadrants 3 and 4, totaling approximately 50 acres are planned for burning this season on Huffman Prairie.