Weather forces cancellation of Tattoo


Members of the Wings of Blue United States Air Force Parachute Team practiced jumping at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Friday afternoon in anticipation of jumping again later in the day as part of the Freedom’s Call Tattoo festivities.

Members of the Wings of Blue United States Air Force Parachute Team practiced jumping at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Friday afternoon in anticipation of jumping again later in the day as part of the Freedom’s Call Tattoo festivities.

Members of the Wings of Blue United States Air Force Parachute Team practiced jumping at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Friday afternoon in anticipation of jumping again later in the day as part of the Freedom’s Call Tattoo festivities.

Members of the Wings of Blue United States Air Force Parachute Team practiced jumping at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Friday afternoon in anticipation of jumping again later in the day as part of the Freedom’s Call Tattoo festivities.

Greene County News Report

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE — Members of the Wings of Blue United States Air Force Parachute Team practiced jumping at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Friday afternoon in anticipation of jumping during Friday’s Freedom’s Call Tattoo festivities.

Their jump did not happen however as the event was cancelled due to poor weather shortly before the gates were to open and the threat of more storms later. The event will not be rescheduled.

“Our weather experts have advised us to expect continued thunderstorms through the evening, to include persistent rain and potential lightning,” 88th Air Base Wing commander Col. John Devillier said in a release. “It’s regrettable that we had to cancel the event but the risk to safety is too great. A lot of hard work went into getting everything ready and like others, I am disappointed we could not share a special event celebrating our rich aviation heritage at Wright-Patterson AFB and within the Miami Valley.”

Tattoo was also cancelled in 2012 when a derecho — a widespread, long-lived, straight-line wind storm — tore through the midwest. A stage nearly collapsed and 19 people were injured.